money·2 min read

Egg Freezing Costs Up To $20,000 — Here's Why It's So Expensive

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Design: theSkimm | Photo: iStock
May 2, 2022

Egg freezing has gone mainstream. Clinics saw an average 30% increase during the pandemic. And in January 2022, NYU doctors say they saw a 41% increase in egg freezing patients.

How much does it cost to freeze your eggs?

A lot. Experts say the average cost for just one cycle can be up to $20,000 — and many women need more than one cycle. Plus storage fees, which can add $500 to $1,000 a year to your budget. PS: Success is not guaranteed. 

Why does egg freezing cost so much? What’s included?

Here’s how it works, and why it costs so much. Assuming storage lasts five years, with the first year free, your bill would look something like this:

Treatment: $11,000

Medication: $5,000

Storage: $2,000

Keep in mind the numbers can vary depending on where you live. These costs also don’t include after-freezing expenses like transplanting eggs into your uterus or the thawing process.

Does insurance help cover the cost of freezing your eggs?

Some plans cover egg freezing if it’s for medical reasons. But only 15 states require insurance companies to cover infertility treatments.  

So I’ll have to foot the entire bill?

Maybe not. More and more companies are adding infertility treatments as an employee perk. Hint: Google, Meta, Apple, and theSkimm (*insert shameless plug here*). But the sad truth is, it’s still pretty uncommon with most employers.

What are the alternatives if my job won’t cover egg freezing costs?

There are a few ways to cover the costs.

Shop around

Companies like Kindbody offer relatively low rates for egg freezing. Think: Around $7,000 for one cycle with one year of storage included.

Build it into your budget

Saving is always a good option. Consider starting a sinking fund specifically for this goal. And use these tips to make more room in your budget.

theSkimm

Egg freezing is on the rise, but it’s still expensive. And while most insurance plans won’t cover the procedure, that doesn’t mean you’ll have to foot the whole bill. 


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